[Whitepaper] How To Implement An Effective Health And Safety Training Process

Regardless of the employer offering or requiring training courses, an ongoing and effective training program can make a huge difference between a measurable presence of a safety culture, or just an image of one.

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While nearly all of the 2016 SmartMarket Report survey respondents (97%) indicated that their companies provide environmental health and safety (EH&S) training, fewer (87%) stated that their companies require all of jobsite workers to have basic EH&S training. Regardless of the employer offering or requiring training courses, an ongoing and effective training program can make a huge difference between a measurable presence of a safety culture, or just an image of one.

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[With Infographic] The ROI of Workplace Safety Practices: 3 Key Areas

Beyond saving lives, occupational health and safety investment gains advantages in other areas of a business as well, including talent management and financial benefits. Within the construction industry specifically, more contractors reported seeing positive impacts from safety investment in 2015 than in 2012.

Workplace safety practices result in lower injury rates. Yet beyond saving lives, occupational health and safety investment gains advantages in other areas of a business as well, including talent management and financial benefits. Within the construction industry specifically, more contractors reported seeing positive impacts from safety investment in 2015 than in 2012, according to the SmartMarket Report’s longitudinal study.

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Safety Leadership: Jobsite Workers’ Role in Building Safety Culture

As employers, it’s critical to protect your workers by building a strong safety culture both from the top down and bottom up! Not only organizational safety leaders should proactively develop an effective safety training program, but jobsite workers must be included in all safety and health planning also.

This year Labor Rights Week focused on reminding ALL U.S workers their right to a safe, healthy and hazard-free workplace. As employers, it’s critical to protect your workers by building a strong safety culture both from the top down and bottom up! Not only organizational safety leaders should proactively develop an effective safety training program, but jobsite workers must be included in all safety and health planning also. We’ve heard of unfortunate mistakes made by several employers in the recent period, such as failure to implement fall protection system, lack of training on machine safety procedures known as lockout/tagout, as well as exposing workers to blocked exits, fall hazards, amputation and chemical hazards. These losses could have been prevented by effective safety training on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), how to prevent slips, trips, and falls, avoid electrical hazards, and more. It’s important to note that providing training is completely different from developing an effective, on-going safety training program, as part of building a strong safety culture (Why should you care? We discussed the benefits of a strong safety culture here).

This blog will explain the role of jobsite workers in ensuring workplace safety and best practices for safety leadership.

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Safety Culture Definition and What It Means to Organization Leaders

Creating a strong safety culture may take months, even years. The 2016 SmartMarket Report: Building A Safety Culture by Dodge Data & Analytics identifies 33 indicators of a safety culture and divides them into seven groups. Management commitment to safety and health is first on the list.

According to OSHA’s definition, in a strong safety culture, “everyone feels responsible for safety and pursues it on a daily basis; employees go beyond the “call of duty” to identify unsafe conditions and behaviors, and intervene to correct them.” Great safety cultures have proved to result in many benefits, including lower injury rates, increased ability to retain existing staff and attract new staff, as well as higher ROI. Dedication to safety and health does not only pertain to high hazard industries such as construction. Big companies in other sectors like Coca-Cola recognized that its success in the long run relies on ensuring the safety of its workers. Because of those benefits, safety related expenses should be deemed investments, not costs.

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